BarnsleyandFamily

Barnsleymemories

 

  

HI MARY

I hope that everyone at your end is well . I hope also that you and Stan har keeping warm and dry . The weather as been the talking point on every bodies lips for the last few days . Whe used to have bad winters with snow and ice but whe used to get through them . These days everything comes to a standstil when snow is about .

The next big event his Christmas . Long gone are the days of the coal fire and putting your list of presents you wanted up the chimney for father Christmas to get . My Grand Dauter , the youngest , stil makes a list but what she does with the list I have no idea . My Gran Mother was born in in the last sentury used to tell me that a Christmas time for there present they used to get and Apple and an orange . How times have changed . I have put down a few true stories for you to read .

SMOKING

At the time that I was growing up around about 1955 it was a big thing to smoke .the men smoked . The women smoke . In a few cases the kids smoked . I was brought up in Lundwood and at least one shop sold cigs in ones . It his only in later life we find out that cigs are not good for you . By then it is too late . I used to play Guitar n a group and my clothes used to smel of cig smoke every time that you opened the case . Speaking of club land , Roy Castle used to play the trumpet in his club act and he died of cancer after a lot of exposure to cig smoke . It is not to say that I never smoked , I did but my dad put paid to that .

I like many kids of my generation copied what the grown ups did , and that included smoking . But the cost of cigs was beyound me . One boy told me that he rolled his own cigs . I remember asking the boy where he got his tobacco from . I was told from spent cigs in the gutter . He told me that the only problem was that you did knot know what tipe of cigs they where . That week I did extra jobs around the house and garden and I got extra pocket money . I got the Risler and the cig papers from Darlys shop . But where to put them .

One of the floor boards in my bedroom was lose . I knew this because every time that I walked on it it made a sound . In those days whe didn’t have fittered carpets , the carpet was loose . I soon found out that the floor boards had been removed at some point . It made a good hiding place for the cig papers and the Risler . I used to walk down the street and in the gutters I found a lot of spent cigs . I had to sneak into my bedroom to get the cig papers and the Risler . Then it was up to the top field to make the cigs . There was no such thing as filter tips in those days . After getting the paper of , then using the cig paper and the Risler out came a cig . Well put it this way , it looked like a cig , the only problem that it was not as hard packed as the cigs that you got from the shop . When you lit it , it was quite hot and you got bits of tobacco everywhere . This lasted for a few weeks .

I came home from the Grammar School that day . The moment I got into the house I new that something was rong . I took my case up the stairs and started to do my home work . I looked to ware the floor board was , it was not in the right place . I went over to the floor board . Pulled the rug back , lifted the floor board . The made up cigs , the Risler and the cig papers where all gone . Someone had found my secrat hiding place . After putting everything back I went down the stairs to face the music .

It was a good job that dad was on the afters and I didn’t have to face him . I got the story from my mother /. It seemed like she had been cleaning the bedroom and her foot went across the lose floor board . She told dad to bring his hammer up and a few nales . Instead of just using the hammer he looked underneath the floor board . What did he find , the Risler , the cig papers and the cigs that I had made . It was a case of wait until your dad getts home . Put it this way , I was fast asleep in bed when he got home from work .

Not a word was sed the next day about the find , nor the next ore the next . I seemed to have got away . Then it was Christmas Day . After the Christmas Dinner and my mother and Grand Mother where washing up at the sink , dad told me that there was another present for me . He told me that he would go up the stairs to the bedroom to get it . My dad had never given me a present it was always under the Christmas Tree . I spottered a rat . By the looks on my mothers face I was right . Dad came down the stairs and gave me his present , it was long and thin . I pulled the rapping of . It was a cigar . He got his Woodbines out and lit up . He lit the cigar up and past it over . I remember his words as though it was yestardy . ‘ So you think that you are a big man , then smoke the cigar . Finish it off no matter how long it takes . ‘

Put it this way . The cigar lasted until the day after Boxing Day . I was sick more than once . It put me off my food . It must have done the trick as I never smoked again .

Q

THE LIKELY LADS AT CHRISTMAS

As the days became shorter and the weather became colder the bike rides to Cudworth Station only appened at the weekend if at all . And when it was midwhiner the bike rides stopped and it was a case of Shanks Poney ( on foot ). I walked for miles around the Barnsley with Ron and Roy . We used to walk around all the streets in Cudworth and Shafton . Some days when we where feeling fit a walk to Athersley was on the cards . There was Athersley North witch at the time was a new estate . The houses where a different colour in the South . On the way there whe had to pass New Lodge . The weather must have been good as whe once made the walk to Royston . Whe new every Fish Shop and shops that where open for miles around .

The best time to make the walk was in the days coming up to Christmas . Everybody seemed to have the curtans open to show of there Christmas Tree and trimings . The Christmas Cards came from the shop they where not made at home as they har today . Whe used to walk for miles looking at them . Once we were walking around Cudworth I think that the street was Church Fields . Whe stopped dead in our tracks for coming towards us was Father Christmas on the back of a lorry . Father Christmas gave us a wave as he went past . As he was near the Church was he on his way to there Christmas Party . He sertanly had a big sack .

For years my mother and Grand mother used to make the Christmas Cake . The Lundwood Hotel in the form of my dad got the rum . ( My dad and The Lundwood Hotel is a different story ). The Cake went into the uven until it was baked . A few days later the finishing tuches went on Marzipan and iceing suger finished the Cake of ane then it was decorated . These days the cake is lucky to get to the finel stage . My wife makes about 6 Christmas Cakes and they har eaten more or less straight away .

STEWART

 

MARY AND STAN

There are many memories of Christmas that I will never forget . One memory his going around the houses of Church members and there families singing Christmas Carols . Another memory is standing on the door step after you had started to sing . A voise would shout from the house , they have been already . Standing on the door step with your hymn book desideing witch hymn to sing next . Going around the area with the Littelworth Crusaders to sing hymns to the old people . Back to Carol Singing . You got at least two verses of the hymn . Next you would say out loud.

Whe wish you a merry Christmas and a happy New Year .

Glad tidings whe bring to you and your Queen .

Whe wish you an happy Christmas and a happy New Year .

At the door would open and then you would get a copper ore two for your troubles . Over the years this as changed quite a bit . No carol . Knock on the door . Door is opend . Child stands on the door step . Merry Christmas , hand goes out for the money saying that the person as been singing . Dirty look at the amount they reseeved . And that is if you are lucky to get a Carol Singer .

This year there is a lot of talk on the Tv about the Earth warming up . Over the last few weeks the wether as been so different , in fact the country as had a lot of snow . Thankfully in this area whe have had snow once . But everything comes to a standstil . The buses do not run , it his the same with the trains and the roads come to a standstil . But it was not always like that .For some reason there is no school . But other countries have snow and they do not come to a standstil .

We are told that the wether patten as changed , ore is it a fact that we har getting soft . I remember the time roads didn’t come to a standstil . Uncle Trevor used to put chains around his tyres for grip . Some cars got stuck trying to get up the hill between Lundwood and Cundy Cross . But people used to give them a puss , they usualy fell down at the top as the car got grip . Before the Priory Campus was built there used to be a big hill witch the kids used to sledge down . Most of the sledge’s where made at the pit . The only problem was that when you got to the bottom of the hill you had to dragh it up again .

Talking about school I remember the time that I fell in an hole . Read on . That morning Dave called for me as usual . I had a napsack on my back for the spear clothes. . We got to the spot where the Betting Shop now stands and then we had to make a decision . To go to school on the road ore the short cut across the tips . The tips won . By the looks of it we where the first people to go across that way . It was a good job that we had oure wellis on as the snow was deep . We draged our feet in the snow . If anyone can remember that far back the tips where being built and there was an edge. Dave found it . One moment whee where talking away .. . The next moment I was talking to myself . Dave had found the edge of the tip and gone down itit took him quite a wile to get up out of the snow and when he was covered from head to togh in snow .

We were in the huts at the time and not in the main body of the school . I am trying to remember how many Huts there was . The Hut that I was in had two classrooms . Our coats and wellis where left out side by the fires . Whe had to get changed and then leave the clothes on a peg . For foot where we had to bring slippers ore go bear foot . The steam used to rise all morning . Neadless to say that we stayed in the classroom until dinner time , and then it was back to the tips home and dinner . After dinner it was back to school again . .

 

MARY . STAN

I have not been in tuch with you since Christmas . Hope you did not get too much to drink . Hope that you are feeling a lot better after your trip abroad. We talk of times gone by but can you remember this .

Standing outside some ones house . The sound of a party going on . The time by my watch was just a few minuts before midnight I was going to let the New Year in . I was not the only one in the street as the boys talked to each other . A quick look at the watch , it was a minut before midnight . I walked to the door of the house on Abbotts Road in Lundwoood . The bells of Monk Bretton Church wheere ringing to let the New Year in . A nock on the door before I started .

Old Year out .

New Year in

Please will you let the lucky bird in .

A sharp knock on the door . Make sertan that I had my lump of coal to put on the fire . The door was opened . Happy New Year . Come in lad and have a drink . I would put the coal on the fire . And before long it would start blazing . Whatever was in the drink it warmed me up . I left the house with lots of money in my pockets . It was on to the next house on my list to repeat the operation one more timee .

This was known as first footing and I was not the only kid in the street to let the New Year in . This Year nobody came . It as been a number of Years when they did . I bet they where all on there computers ore there Play Stations .

DUBONNET

I remember the time my dad got a lot of mixed drinks from my mothers Club . I think it was Grattons . That Year I let it be nown among the kids that I would be letting the New Year in at homee . My mother and dad where having a party after they had been out to the Lundwood Hotel . The time for me to go outside . The Church Bells where ringing . Armed with my lump of coal , I sed my peace and knocked on the door . I was invited in . I put the coal on the fire . Bean drunk I got quite a lot of money from the gusts at the party . My dad had told me that I was able to be the bar man for the party .

The men drank the beer and the ladies where drinking the shorts . But no one was drinking the Dubonnet . As no one was looking I pored myself a glass . It was not bad at all . As I was working I kept on drinking the Dubonney . I felt good but warm inside . The last dregs whent down . I put the bottol in the sack to be disguarded in the morning . It was then I started to feel a bit sick . My legs started to go . Everybody was looking at me . My Grand Mother pulled up a chair for me to sit on . By this time I was realy feeling sick . People where standing around , giving there serport at the same time as they where drinking . One of the men told my Grand Mother what I neaded was one of Albert Hersts Pork Pies . That did it . I frew up . My Grand Mother was quick to get me away from the drinks .

My mother asked me what I had been eating ore drinking that night . Dad came over with the empty bottol of Dubonnet that he had taken out of the bin . By this time I was anybodies . Every time that I stood up I fell back on the chair . The room was spinning . My Grand Mother told the party that I was drunk . I had to be carried to bed that night . I was sick a few times before I went to sleep and in the morning I stil ‘ Felt ruff ‘.

I was working for Redferns Glass Works and being in the quality I was sent to St, alberns on a customer complant . I went down with anouther man . The moment we went into the factory I got a smell that I remembered . There where only two lines and they where both bottling Dubonney . It was a long , long day and I was glad when it was time to go home .

 

 





Lundwood . Burton Grange . Cundy Cross
Some 2 and a half miles from Barnsley the village of Lundwood lies . The old name for the part of the village that whe lived in was was Burton Grange and my mother stook to that name all her life . You will find out later about the names . Between the village and Barnsley stands Cundy Cross . Having lived in the area for most of my life the changes are remarkable . I try to take the reader back in time to see what life was like
The NHS provides the majority of healthcare in England, including primary care (such as general practitioners), in-patient care, long-term healthcare, ophthalmology and dentistry (NHS dentistry is done by dentists in private practice doing sub-contracted work for the NHS). The National Health Service Act 1946 came into effect on 5 July 1948. Private health care has continued parallel to the NHS, paid for largely by private insurance, but it is used by less than 8% of the population, and generally as a top-up to NHS services.
Long before we had an Health Senter the doctor used a council house on Pontefract Road for his surgery . If you neaded to go into hospital you went to Beckets Hospital . There was a CO-OP Chemists on the main road to take the prescription to . We had a midwife as well as can be seen in the first story . The first two are still there but in different locations . At the moment the Health Service is going through a bad time but in the days that I ham talking about it was all so simple .
On the right hand side of Abbotts Road lived the Bailey family . The wife was the local Midwife . I used to work at Beasons and Clarks with her husband Albert . I believe he was a foreman operator in the glass works. They had one daughter and if I knew her name I must have forgot it . The rule was that you had the first baby in the hospital and after that it was up too the Midwife . You offten saw her in her little car dashing around the village . For the life of me I can’t remember her name . I know that they made a move to a bigger house on Pontefract Road . I lost contact with Albert when I moved jobs . I was born at Pinnda Oaks in Barnsley . And there my first story lies . I was but a few days hold . I ham not sertan that the Midwife still exists today .
Dad went along to the registar office in the then Town Hall . My mother and father had picked the name Stuart for me . Dad went into the office . The woman asked him for my name . Was it Stuart the christian name ore Stewart the sir name . She showed him the book with the two spellings . She had not told him about the two spellings . It was a toss up for the name . I became Stewart for ever more . He must have been right , ore was I too young to understand . I went to the Grammar School in Barnsley and I answered to the name of Fred , but that’s a different story .
Although the doctors surgery was knot part of the shops it performed a vital part to the community . The doctors surgery was held in one of the Council Houses along the mane Ponterfract Road that ran through the senter off the village . Before someone built a shed the patients had to wait outside . The best way is to take reader through a morning at the surgery . ( The thing that you have to remember that The Health Service was still in its infancy not like it is today . )
That morning I woke up with a bit of a sore throat , mind you it didn’t stop me from eating breakfast as I was only having cornflakes with a lot of milk on them . Mam told me that she would take me along to see the doctor . The school bobby would pay us another visit . I think that the school bobbies name was Gosling . For the readers information the school bobby was sent out to yore house to make sertan that you were not playing truant . Put it this way he never came to our house for the last reson as I liked school . So I covered my mouth with a scarf to keep the cold out and followed mother down the street . It was sods law that someone would ask you where you were going . The problem was that the school and the doctors were in the same direction . By the time we had got to the doctors everyone knew that I was knot going to school that day . At least it would stop the school bobby from coming .
Mother was always at the doctors because I was a sickly child and me and the doctor were of first names terms . In fact by I had been in hospital at least three times by the age of fore . I had pneumonia two times and something else that I can’t remember . I always remember the doctor saying that we went along in seven year cycles and if I didn’t get better after that time I would always be sick . He was right . Until my stroke I was better apart from the odd cold . Speeking of having a stroke I can not remember anything about it . People tell me that I went to the doctors as I was feeling a bit unwell , but try as I minet I can not remember eny of the events . All I can remember is a bright light and my head hurting .
We got to the Council House and went down the drive . The house was on the main Pontefract Road. Being Monday every road seemed to head that way . If you where on the sick from work it was time to get a sick note . Before a shed was built you had to stand around in all tyeps of wether . On a cold winters day the doctors was knot the place to be . If you hadn’t a cold before you went there , you had one when you returned back home In the days that we are talking about the heath service was knot as strong as it his now and very often the doctor was called away to see someone who needed is services quickley . On a Monday the doctors used to be full as the men went along for there sick notes . The cry went around the waiting people that the doctor had gone out . The patients had to wait until the doctor returned . The cry went around that the doctor had returned , and the queue started moving again . The thing that I always found serprising that with a few questions asked everyone knew there place in the queue . We used to go into the shed after waiting outside . The trouble was a right gale blew through the shed . If you had the door shut you were unable to hear anything. If you were a smoker the man ore woman usually stayed outside . The queue was moving again . From the shed the next port of call was the kitchen and not being very big only a few people were able to get inside . It was hear that the coughing and spluttering got really bad . We used to go around the kitchen until it was your turn to go into see the doctor . It was really amazing how a man had been spluttering could get better after he had got a sick note . As the person left the cry of ‘next please ‘ came from the door and we went into see the doctor . The doctor used to cry out ‘next please ‘.
The doctor was seated at the big desk in the room with the doctors Secretary took notes on the other desk in the room . Wether it was lack of space ore what but these days the doctors Secretary would not be in the same room as the doctor . Just think of the facts she must have heard . Doctor Burke would utter the words ’what is wrong with the boy this time ‘ and away would go mother and tell the doctor my problems . He would beckoned me over to his side and stick something in my mouth to see if I was alright . This done he would pull out his scope to test my breathing. This done he would tern to my mother and tell her what he had found . He made out the prescripten to give to the chemist and we left . If it was a Monday it took a long time to see everybody . I remember that I once had a wart and he painted something on it to burn it off . As you left the kitchen the next person went in .
The next stage was to take the prescripten along to the chemists shop .The shop was on the Main Pontefract Road , next door to the paper shop . In those days the chemists shop was run by the CO-OP and in later years Pat Hall used to work there . The prescripten was handed to the girl at the counter who then took it to the back room for the chemist . The same faces Were in the chemists shop that were in the doctors . Very often the chemist would come from the back room and ask the man ore woman a few questions about the prescripten . As I told you it was a big shop and it had a smell that I will never forget . It was a smell of sent , carbolick soap and all the things in the shop . The waiting time was spent looking around the shop . The faces of the people in the chemists shop used to be the same faces that used to be in the doctors . Mother always got me a few sweets before we left the shop .
The doctors job was a seven day a week job . Not only did he do days but he covered at night as well . He smoked as could be seen by his thingers . The word went around the village that he liked his tot of whisky as well . He was not the only doctor on the panel . He was not the only doctor with a sergery in Lundwood as there was another doctor , and yes the sergery was in a Council House on the main Ponterfract Road .
 
 
THE BOOKIES RUNNER
About half way up Abbotts Road on the left hand side lived the bookies runner . There was no such thing as a betting shop , if you wanted to put a bet on the best place was the corse . The bigger book makers set up people in the work place ore even at home to take the bets . The one in hour village was an EX Jockey , ore had he been a stable lad , we will never know . He had a phone to keep in touch with his head office . every time you went past the house he was always on the phone . It was not until Dave told me what he did , and the penny clicked . In the day time there was always somebody knocking at his door . I had the imprecion that he ran a club of some sort . I remember telling Dave about the man and his many visitors . It was then that Dave told me what he did . How thick can you get From time to time the police used to cart him off in the Black Maria . It was a formalaty as before very long he was back in business. Remember that the police men liked a bet as well . For some of the men the bet was there life , non more so than the miner .
The start of the betting shops . 1960: Game on for British betting shops. . The government has given the go-ahead for betting shops to open for business from 1 May next year. The move follows the introduction of the new Betting and Gaming Act. The aim is to do away with archaic, restrictive and often inconsistent laws on gambling. . The betting shop is now a way of life for a lot of people .Today one is able to put a bet on anything from horse raceing to football . In fact you are able to get a bet on most everything if the odds are OK .
I have never been inside a betting shop but I have had the odd flutter . The first year that Red Rum won the Grand National I not only drew him in the sweepstake at work , I also got the second and third . The only trouble was the last two were on paper only . If I had placed a bet I would have been a rich man . If only , if only . For the hard drinking man the betting shop became part of the furniture . In fact the betting shop in Lundwood was in the film Kes In fact as far as I remember there used to be a betting shop at Cundy Cross . It was around the side of Oxlleys Fish Shop . It was on a good site on the main road and parking was not too bad . I have know idea what appened to the shop , but I think that bussness was knot too good . Ore was the rent to high , we will never No the facts of the case .
The strangest thing that I remember is going to uncle Ron’s for a holiday . He lived in Belfast . On one street that I went down men where taking bets on a card game . The maniger off the group that I was in , George McDonald , was a betting shop maniger , I think coming to .
The Dirt Track
Right on top of the wood was the Dirt Track . The Track was round in shape and must have been at least a quarter of a mile round . At some point it must have been used for racing but it was disused when I was a boy . But the kids of the area used to play on it . In the back of my mined there is something about scrambling an Yorkshire Televison . But I no if you went around the Dirt Track on your bike one lap was enough. Whe will meet the Dirt Track later on .
The Farms
There where two farms in the village . The farms where on the top of the village . One of the farms was more of a small holding . If I am not mistaken the first farm was Pent lows Farm . I remember horses by the road side . In the back of the farm I think there was an orchard . It was a bit run down .
You went of the road and down a big drive to get to the next farm . This was Rodburns Farm . I only went down the farm once and that was with David . His mother was going out with Maurice Rodburn at the time . She later married him and the family moved away to a different part of the country . I think that it was the Fens . The Farm itself seemed to be a mixed farm . I can remember oats and hears of corn . The farm had quite a few cows and the Co-op went to the farm to pick the milk up .
There was a foot path quite a way from the farmyard that ran through the feels over a stile and down to the River Dearne . There used to be a rope swing over the River and the boys used to pThe swim pulled the girls in , lay on it during the Summer . If the boy was adventure he swam in . .If you continuade to the left hand side you came to the old WW1 firing range . There was also a path witch lent to Ardsley .
Lundwood Hospital
A building that has long past into time was the Lundwood Hospital . For the story of the last time the Hospital was used go to Mary Lipscome site on the Internet . You will fined an article written by Pam Fisher (nee Thorpe ) off fish shop fame . As a young boy I never went inside the Hospital . My mother put the fear of God into me about the Hospital and what I would catch if I went inside . When ever I went up the wood I would walk past as fast as my legs would carry me . When the Hospital came to be disused it was burn to the ground before the site was used agan .
THE SEWERAGE WORKS
Knot having a photo of the Sewerage it must be very hard to imagine what it was like . In summer you had to keep your doors shut as the smell was too great . The sewerage flies where everywhere . The smell was not one to be forgoten . I lived quite away from the sewerage but we had still to keep the doors shut . The only way to keep the flies out was to have some sort of shutter door built . To keep the flies down the beds of the sewerage were spraide very often . Imagined having a birthday party and having to keep the doors shut .
The sewerage works at some time were brought up to date . I remember the Chronical having an articull witch told us that the Sewerage Works were the most moderen in Urop . The plant is now run by Yorkshire Water , but if the wind is in the right direction you still get a smell . The flies have knot been as bad for the last few years , so some progress has been made .
The next part of the story is corect but I think that the dates way be a little off . The word went around the village that the Sewerage Works were to have a bit of work in fact they where being made bigger . The diggers moved in and trees were uprooted . One of the boys Must have known one of the digger drivers as he got a full tree , roots and all .
Word quickly around the village that wood was to be had at the Sewerage Works . I went along to the Sewerage Works with my trolley . It was mainly roots and I made about three trips to get the wood . Let’s say that no body went short that Bonfire Night
STOP PRESS
Published Date: 19 May 2008
By Gail Robinson . Sheffield Star .
Fed up residents living in a village near Barnsley say they are being plagued by thousands of flies because of maintenance work at a sewage works.People in Lundwood claim for the past four weeks they have been forced to kill swarms of insects in their houses and then sweep up piles of dead flies Hairdresser Pat Cherry of Lund Avenue, said flies had even dropped into her food while she was cooking . And fellow resident Barry Barker, said: "There's been absolutely thousands upon thousands of them. I'm fed up with itA letter from Yorkshire Water, sent to residents, said the high number of flies was due to a £17 million scheme of essential improvement work at a nearby water treatment plant . A company spokesman said they were spraying the worst-affected areas with insecticide and fly numbers should drop "dramatically" as a result.
MR . SMITH
On the corner of Lund Lane and Abbotts Road lived Mr. Smith and his wife . I can’t tell the reader how old he was ore what he did for a living . To me he had been there all of my life . If ever there was a Stepto and Sun he was it . Apart from collecting rags he sold sticks as well . He had a place up the wood for his barrow and to chop sticks . Only the ‘Posh ‘ people used Zip fire lighters . Most people used to use sticks to light there fires as they where plentyfull with all the new building going on.
I remember that dad and mam had gone on holiday to Bridlinton for there summer holidays , leaving me to mind the house . It was Barnsley Feast Week . I was in the house alone for the first time . My grand mother went with them . A knock came to the door . It was Mr. Smith . He told me that he had some second hand shoes for sale . I had two Albert Hirsts pies in the oven and a big plate of chips on the gas cooker . I told him that I would go around after dinner . I did the washing up and took the van around to his house . ‘The van was a Ford Thames and I used to use it for the market ‘. The van was kept in the back yard fully loaded . (Leaving the van on the path in the front of the garage fully loaded was a thing that I did every day . I would not do the same today as someone would take it load and all . )
The sun was shining as I took the van around to the house . Mr. Smith was in the garden getting the sun . The door of the shed was open . He asked if I had tried my hand selling second hand shoes . He took me to the shed to show me the shoes . He told me that they wanted sorting out as he just put the shoes in as they came . He gave me a pare to have a look at . They seemed alright . The shed was packed to the top with shoes . I looked around and he was right , they neaded sorting . He asked how much I would give him for the lot . I think that the price we came to was Ten Pounds . I went back home to put the stock in the shed and went back to the house with the money . The shoes filled the van and after they where loaded I went back home . I took the van down the drive and left it as I went into the house for a cup of tea .
As I sed it was a warm day . I opened the door of the van . The smell that greeted me is one that I will never forget . It was obnoxuass . I closed the door , to get rid of the smell . I went up the stairs and into my mothers room . There was some sent on the table . It had been a Christmas present that she never used . Way be that would do the trick . The van door was oppened again , but this time the inside of the van was spraid with sent . The door was shut again . I went into the house to have a drink . The door of the van was oppened again . This time the smell was bad but knot obviously knot as bad . It was the Thursday and the family would come home from Bridlington on the Saturday . I had to get a move on if I was to sort the shoes out before they came home .
The first thing was to sort the shoes out for size . This was not an easy task . All day the shoes were sorted and there was know pares . A lot of the shoes where covered in milldew . These where washed , but the moment the shoe was dry the milldew came back . These had to be thrown away . The best way of getting rid of the shoes was on the fire . If you found one that looked OK the problem was to fined a pare the same size . There must have been a lot of one legged people in Lundwood . I went to bed that night feeling that I had been had .
Friday came bright and clear . I must have given the neighbour quite a fright as he was in the garden having a cup of tea . I had set the alarm to go off at six to get a full day on the shoes . It was the same story as the day before . The only winner was Mr. Smith . The fire didn’t do too bad . I sat down at dinner time and there were gust three pares of shoes to take to the market . By this time I had found more pares of shoes but still there was not much to show for all the work . At the end of the day I was able to load ten pares of shoes for the market . A lot of hard work had gone in for know rewards . I went to bed that night thinking I had been dun .
It was Saturday morning and I was to stand the market in Barnsley . I had a quick look around the house to make sertan that every thing was all right and then I left to stand the market . The van was already loaded and off I went to the market .
I came back to fined all the doors in the house open . I left the van on the road and went into the house . The first thing that grand mother said was ‘you are in for it ‘. Mother ask ed me where her sent was . She had been looking for it all around the house . She was giving the sent as a present from the seaside . I told her that I had knot seen the sent . I asked why the windows were all open . Mother asked what the funny smell was . Dad told me that he was going to have the chimney sweep but there was know soot . If only they knew what I was doing in there absence . The shoes were on the stall for a very long time . In fact they ended up on the fire .
Miss Bootton
At one time we like the French used to get oure bread on a daily basis . Lundwood had a bakers shop . It stud on Pontefract Road on the right hand side of the village . The next shop was down in the village . There was a bake house around the back of the shop . The name of the proprietor was Miss Booton . I never knew wheter there was a Mr. Booton ore knot but the baker was a man . I know that he started work early to get everything ready to sell .
Sliced bread was a thing for the future and we had to use the breead knife to get the slices . Try as you may the slices got bigger as you went along . They not only got bigger the shape of the slices got a little bit funny . You ended up with a door stop at the end . The shop sold something called mock cream . It was not only used on all the buns and cakes but was also sold to the public . I often went along with my bole to get the mock cream . And people came from far and wide for it Mock Cream was a War time thing and on the BBC Peoples War Site I found the following .
.
MOCK CREAM
I oz margarine
I oz sugar
I tablespoon of dried milk
I tablespoon of milk
Cream the margarine and sugar. Beat in the milk powder and liquid mil

 

 
 
 
Lundwood . Burton Grange . Cundy Cross
Some 2 and a half miles from Barnsley the village of Lundwood lies . The old name for the part of the village that whe lived in was was Burton Grange and my mother stook to that name all her life . You will find out later about the names . Between the village and Barnsley stands Cundy Cross . Having lived in the area for most of my life the changes are remarkable . I try to take the reader back in time to see what life was like
The NHS provides the majority of healthcare in England, including primary care (such as general practitioners), in-patient care, long-term healthcare, ophthalmology and dentistry (NHS dentistry is done by dentists in private practice doing sub-contracted work for the NHS). The National Health Service Act 1946 came into effect on 5 July 1948. Private health care has continued parallel to the NHS, paid for largely by private insurance, but it is used by less than 8% of the population, and generally as a top-up to NHS services.
Long before we had an Health Senter the doctor used a council house on Pontefract Road for his surgery . If you neaded to go into hospital you went to Beckets Hospital . There was a CO-OP Chemists on the main road to take the prescription to . We had a midwife as well as can be seen in the first story . The first two are still there but in different locations . At the moment the Health Service is going through a bad time but in the days that I ham talking about it was all so simple .
On the right hand side of Abbotts Road lived the Bailey family . The wife was the local Midwife . I used to work at Beasons and Clarks with her husband Albert . I believe he was a foreman operator in the glass works. They had one daughter and if I knew her name I must have forgot it . The rule was that you had the first baby in the hospital and after that it was up too the Midwife . You offten saw her in her little car dashing around the village . For the life of me I can’t remember her name . I know that they made a move to a bigger house on Pontefract Road . I lost contact with Albert when I moved jobs . I was born at Pinnda Oaks in Barnsley . And there my first story lies . I was but a few days hold . I ham not sertan that the Midwife still exists today .
Dad went along to the registar office in the then Town Hall . My mother and father had picked the name Stuart for me . Dad went into the office . The woman asked him for my name . Was it Stuart the christian name ore Stewart the sir name . She showed him the book with the two spellings . She had not told him about the two spellings . It was a toss up for the name . I became Stewart for ever more . He must have been right , ore was I too young to understand . I went to the Grammar School in Barnsley and I answered to the name of Fred , but that’s a different story .
Although the doctors surgery was knot part of the shops it performed a vital part to the community . The doctors surgery was held in one of the Council Houses along the mane Ponterfract Road that ran through the senter off the village . Before someone built a shed the patients had to wait outside . The best way is to take reader through a morning at the surgery . ( The thing that you have to remember that The Health Service was still in its infancy not like it is today . )
That morning I woke up with a bit of a sore throat , mind you it didn’t stop me from eating breakfast as I was only having cornflakes with a lot of milk on them . Mam told me that she would take me along to see the doctor . The school bobby would pay us another visit . I think that the school bobbies name was Gosling . For the readers information the school bobby was sent out to yore house to make sertan that you were not playing truant . Put it this way he never came to our house for the last reson as I liked school . So I covered my mouth with a scarf to keep the cold out and followed mother down the street . It was sods law that someone would ask you where you were going . The problem was that the school and the doctors were in the same direction . By the time we had got to the doctors everyone knew that I was knot going to school that day . At least it would stop the school bobby from coming .
Mother was always at the doctors because I was a sickly child and me and the doctor were of first names terms . In fact by I had been in hospital at least three times by the age of fore . I had pneumonia two times and something else that I can’t remember . I always remember the doctor saying that we went along in seven year cycles and if I didn’t get better after that time I would always be sick . He was right . Until my stroke I was better apart from the odd cold . Speeking of having a stroke I can not remember anything about it . People tell me that I went to the doctors as I was feeling a bit unwell , but try as I minet I can not remember eny of the events . All I can remember is a bright light and my head hurting .
We got to the Council House and went down the drive . The house was on the main Pontefract Road. Being Monday every road seemed to head that way . If you where on the sick from work it was time to get a sick note . Before a shed was built you had to stand around in all tyeps of wether . On a cold winters day the doctors was knot the place to be . If you hadn’t a cold before you went there , you had one when you returned back home In the days that we are talking about the heath service was knot as strong as it his now and very often the doctor was called away to see someone who needed is services quickley . On a Monday the doctors used to be full as the men went along for there sick notes . The cry went around the waiting people that the doctor had gone out . The patients had to wait until the doctor returned . The cry went around that the doctor had returned , and the queue started moving again . The thing that I always found serprising that with a few questions asked everyone knew there place in the queue . We used to go into the shed after waiting outside . The trouble was a right gale blew through the shed . If you had the door shut you were unable to hear anything. If you were a smoker the man ore woman usually stayed outside . The queue was moving again . From the shed the next port of call was the kitchen and not being very big only a few people were able to get inside . It was hear that the coughing and spluttering got really bad . We used to go around the kitchen until it was your turn to go into see the doctor . It was really amazing how a man had been spluttering could get better after he had got a sick note . As the person left the cry of ‘next please ‘ came from the door and we went into see the doctor . The doctor used to cry out ‘next please ‘.
The doctor was seated at the big desk in the room with the doctors Secretary took notes on the other desk in the room . Wether it was lack of space ore what but these days the doctors Secretary would not be in the same room as the doctor . Just think of the facts she must have heard . Doctor Burke would utter the words ’what is wrong with the boy this time ‘ and away would go mother and tell the doctor my problems . He would beckoned me over to his side and stick something in my mouth to see if I was alright . This done he would pull out his scope to test my breathing. This done he would tern to my mother and tell her what he had found . He made out the prescripten to give to the chemist and we left . If it was a Monday it took a long time to see everybody . I remember that I once had a wart and he painted something on it to burn it off . As you left the kitchen the next person went in .
The next stage was to take the prescripten along to the chemists shop .The shop was on the Main Pontefract Road , next door to the paper shop . In those days the chemists shop was run by the CO-OP and in later years Pat Hall used to work there . The prescripten was handed to the girl at the counter who then took it to the back room for the chemist . The same faces Were in the chemists shop that were in the doctors . Very often the chemist would come from the back room and ask the man ore woman a few questions about the prescripten . As I told you it was a big shop and it had a smell that I will never forget . It was a smell of sent , carbolick soap and all the things in the shop . The waiting time was spent looking around the shop . The faces of the people in the chemists shop used to be the same faces that used to be in the doctors . Mother always got me a few sweets before we left the shop .
The doctors job was a seven day a week job . Not only did he do days but he covered at night as well . He smoked as could be seen by his thingers . The word went around the village that he liked his tot of whisky as well . He was not the only doctor on the panel . He was not the only doctor with a sergery in Lundwood as there was another doctor , and yes the sergery was in a Council House on the main Ponterfract Road .

 

 


Working For The Paper Shops
The Barnsley Chronicle is a weekly local newspaper printed in the town of Barnsley, South Yorkshire. The newspapers offices are on Church Street in Barnsley Town Centre. The paper comes out every Friday and is printed with seven district editions: Town, Royston/Cudworth/Grimethorpe, Wombwell/Darfield, Darton, Penistone, Hoyland and the Dearne. The Editor is Robert Cockroft. People have instant axcess to the news on there Computers and news becomes old hat very quickly . But in the days of the story the paper was the best way of reading the news .
Before I start on the story witch is true I must tell you a few facts . In the days that I was growing up there were know fast food places and the only way to get money was to work for it . In fact dads favorit saying was when I asked for more pockit money was , ’I only work at the pit , I do knot own it ’ . Money was tight but dad did his best , as well as mother . In fact they did more than the best for me . went to the Grammar School in Barnsley and I had my name down for two paper shops . It was a boys only school and a few of the fathers must have good jobs as some of the boys seemed to have money to burn . My dad worked at Monk Bretton Pit and he was on the night shift . There were three paper shops in the area . The paper shop on the Lundwood side of the village served Burton Grange . The paper shop on the Burton Grange side of the village served Lundwood the top paper shop served parts of Burton Grange as well as the houses up Cundy Cross .In my time I worked for two of the paper shops as my story tells .
Someone was knocking on the front door and mother went to see who it was . It was Ron Wooding from the Lundwood paper shop . Mother knew that my name was down for the job as paper boy . Ron asked if I was in . Mother told him that I had just left to to get the Lundwood bus for school . He asked if I would go around to the shop that evening . She Told Ron that she would send me around after I came home from school ad was in bed and when he got up mother told him that Ron had been . The job was the talking point for the rest of the afternoon . The moment that I got home from school mother told me . Dad had his bit . The job was alright as long as it did not inter interfear with my school work . I told him that I had not got the job yet . Mother made me a drink before I went to the paper shop . At least I would be out of there hare . If I got the job it would be an end to pocket money .
It was not a big shop and I had to wait outside . Most people were coming for the evening paper , The Star , and it was quite a wile before Ron was able to talk . Ron told me what the pay was for the job and told me that he had got good words about me from asking some people . Ron told me that he had made arangements for we to give the job a try the next morning . And with that I left the shop . I was on my way to being a paper boy . That night before I went to bed I set the alarm . Dad sometimes got out of the pit early and I did knot want him to stay up .
Someone was tugging on my shoulder and they would not stop . I awoke to find that it was dad . I got up and got dressed and went down the stares . Dad told me that he would go to bed now that I was awake . I found the pot of tea and the slice of toast that he had made . Now to get to the shop . It was a fine day as I made my way to the shop . Ron was just opening the paper shop up as I got there . I helped put the papers up . The magazeans were a different matter . The house number had to be put on everyone . Ron asked if I wanted a drink before we started . One of the girls was coming in to man the shop wile Ron took me around the round . As I was drinking the tea Ron was serving the customers . It was mainly papers . A girl came into the shop and after putting her coat in the house she returned to the shop . Introductions were made and after a wile Ron told we he was ready to start the round . We left the shop for the Avenue and the start of the paper round . He told me that the round was split in two . The other round was was mainly Harold Avenue . I never met the other person that did this round . But I had the feeling that it was one of the men on long time sick from the pit . I have a name but it would not be right to put it into print .
We had just got across the main road and I had to change shoulders as the bag was heavy . We turned right onto Priory Road . I noticed that the name of Harold Avenue did not appear in the round book . Ron told me that the Avenue was part of someone else round . The more that I got into the job I was glad that someone else did the Avenue . The round was knot rocket science and after a few minuts I was getting the hang of it . Ron just stood at the gate as I did the work . The bag went from shoulder to shoulder as we made our way along Priory Road . The thing that I noted was that most of the houses had papers . I did the few houses on Priory Place and then back onto the road . A few people stopped me and asked for there papers . Mainly they were walking the dog . The ardest bit of the round was trying to remember who had taken there papers . At last we crossed the street to the left hand side .
Ron was enjoying the round as it gave him the chance to meet and talk to people . Me it was different . I had lost count of the number of times that I had moved the bag from shoulder to shoulder . Even though I played rugby for the school my legs began to ache . The plus side was that the bag was getting lighter . We seemed to be going down hill back to the shop . Quite soon we were doing the last house and making our way back to the on the last part of the round . The next part of the round . We had a drink and Ron sorted a few problems out before we went on the last part of the round .
We left the shop and made our way to the main Pontefract Road . And then I started . At first it wasn’t too bad . The only problem was that there was no short cuts , every house you had to go down the drive and back . To make matter worse the drives not only got bigger they started to go down hill . It was like going down a mountain and back up again . The drives got shorter as the last house was reached . The bag still had a few papers left . It was then that Ron dropped another bomb shell . We had to do a few houses on the main road . I remember asking Ron if the round was nearly finished as by this time my legs where really aching and I was getting a bit fed up . His words where ‘nearly ‘. But nearly turned out to be a long way for my aching back and feet .
The first house was around the back of The Lundwood Hotel . As we went down the drive the dogs started barking and when we got to the house part we put the papers in the letter box . The thing that you have to remember is that the houses came at a later date . Just before the railway bridge there were only two houses and both of these had papers . We went over the bridge to the houses along Pontifract Road . The last house was the one opersit to Rose Cottage . The bag was empty at last . Now to go home . On the way Ron asked me was the job for me . I told him that I would give the job a good shot . Ron told me that he would take the bag and the round book back to the paper shop and he would see me on the Monday . We parted company at the top of Abbots Road . I went home . I had got a job at last , no more pocket money for me . I was already making plans for the money .
Dad was still in bed when I got home . The first thing that I asked mother was to get the breakfast on as I was starving . Dad must have herd me and came down the stares to see how I went on . He was going to the barbers shop for his hare trimming and so mother made him a bit of breakfast as well . Me , I went to bed for a nap . And so started my life as a paper boy .I was too late to catch the bus to Barnsley as I knew they would be full at that time of the morning with people going to work .
The following Monday I started the paper round proper . The job got easier as the week went along and by the Thursday I was getting used to the job . At first the bag rubbed my shoulders but a bit of padding did the trick . People chained there magazeens like wallpaper , but at least I had the round book to fall back on . I had to run a bit in those first few days to catch the Lundwood bus . The word went around the school that I had a job and people asked me what it was like . I told them it was very hard . But nothing prepared me for Chronical Day .
On the Friday I was up around the same time and went down to the paper shop . It was then that I got the first shock . Ron went around the back of the shop and pulled two bags out . I asked what the bag contained . I was told it was Chronical Day . There was no way that I was able to carry two bags around the paper round . I had to take half the round around and come back for the rest of the papers . The trouble was that the Chronical was a big size and nearly every house had one . There was only one thing for it at this time was to try and get around and still go to school . As I started the round the latter seemed out of reach . The round was split in half by me . I would take the right hand side first and then come back for the left hand side of the road . And that is what I did . It was like a new round even though I had only got the Chronical extra. I finished the first side of the road and went back for the next bag of papers . One look at my watch and I new that I was running late . For some reson the bag didn’t seem as heavy that morning . The customers must have noted I was having a bad day . I snapped back a few times . I had the feeling that mother would be standing at the gate looking for me . If I did not turn up in the next few minuts she would waken dad up to come looking for me . The trouble was that the more that I tried to rush , the more mistakes I made . Ron would have to go around the customers with there papers . At last the round was finished and I was able to make my way home . Mother was looking down the street for me . Dad was just putting his coat on to come looking for me . Mother heard my story and told me that I had to pack the job in . Dad told me that he would think of something for next week . I was buggered and I had mist my bus , so the best place for me was bed . The trouble with that was I did not get any home work that week and I would have to catch up later . I stayed in bed all morning and when I got mother was still dogging at me to pack the paper round in .
Dad was busy that week as he wade me a trolley to put the Chronicals on . The trolley did the trick . I was able to take all the papers with me . Dad went around with me for the first few weeks but as I went on the round became easier and I was able to do the Friday round by myself . The only thing that I mist was the lie in in the school holidays . o put the job into a nut shell . It was alright in the sunny wether but not so good in the rain and snow . The rain was the worst . You would get wet at least three times . And if hit was heavy rain you got soked to the skin . Having to get up for the round and then going to school was all right . The money was not very good as I found out later . I spent one Christmas doing the job . The tips were not too bad . Duncan Sharp took over the shop just before I left . Perhaps I was ready for a change and when Stan Cooper from the next paper shop offered me a job working for him I told him yes . I can not remember how the job ended ore who tuck the round over . But end it did and I moved paper shops to that of Stan Cooper .
The move to the knew paper shop was seem less . For more money than at the last paper shop I only worked on a Sunday morning . Just what I neaded at this time in my school life . As I told the reader I had two paper rounds on a Sunday . The first round took in the streets of Willman Road and Friars Road and Abbots Road . Compared with the last job it was a doddle . When I had finished the first part of the round I used to go home for my breakfast . Dad was still in bed and it gave me the chance to talk to my mother . And after breakfast I used to go back to the paper shop for the next part of the round .
The next part of the round was an eye oppener . The streets that were part of my round were Wike Road and Michael’s Road . By and by most of the people were alright , if they went to the shop for there papers they let you know . In that case it was just a matter of collecting the paper money . But one particuler costamer tryde to book the sistam . Stan proved that he was up to there tricks . I was told to leave the paper even if I got no answer. One customer was never in when I called . The paper was shoved in the letter box and that was it . This went on for about 6 weeks . Stan told me that he would sort the matter out . On the paper book there was a marker witch to me to collect the paper money from the next door neighbour . I put the papers in the door and the next door neighbour paid we . Getting back to the shop I asked Stan what he did . He told me that he went around to the house but got no answer. The woman next door told him that the man and woman were on the night shift and the boy was at school . Stan kept on knocking until the window was opened to reveal a woman in her night dress . He told her that he had come for the paper money . He told her that he would keep on knocking until he got paid . The knocking had brought the neighbours out . The door was opened to reveal the woman in her night dress . The woman told Stan that she would have to go to the bank for the money as she was a bit short . Stan told her that he was knot leaving until he got the paper money . She had to borrow the paper money from the woman next door . It sertanley did the trick , from that date the paper money was always there .
At Christmas the tips where quite good . As I was in direct contact with the customer I often received them . The job went on very well until it came to altering the clocks backward ore forward. The next true story tells of how it was I went to bed early that Saturday night as we put the clocks forward and I would lose a bit of sleep . I made sertan that the clock was on the right time . The alarm went of and I turned it off . It was dark outside . I made my way down the stares and into the kitchen . II made myself a cup of tea before I went outside . The wether was not bad apart from being dark . I got to the paper shop and it was in darkness . The early morning dew made sitting out of the question . So I leaned on a lamp post .
There was nobody about at that time . I should have smelt a rat at that time but I didn’t . I must have been hanging on the lamp post for about half an hour . I got a dirty look from a man who was walking the dog . The sound of a van was heard , and very shortly it pulled up . The man delivering the papers I did knot know . He gave me a dirty look as he put the papers down At last the door was opening . Stan was really surprised to fined me outside the shop . The first thing that I did was go to the loo, and then I asked Stan what time it was . He told me the time and I looked at my watch . My watch was 1 hour fast . Straight away I new that it must be dads work And it was .did he get it when I returned for my breakfast . Dad said that he was only trying to be helpful . I told him that it was not funny when he laughed.
I stayed at Stan’s paper shop until it was time for work . The pocket money went to good use . I learned a lot about my fellow workers . Some of these I used later in time . To start work was the thing and I got my first job working for Woodcocks the estate agents . And there lies another story for a future date .

 

 
Cliff’s Fish Shop
As a boy whe used to go to the Savoy picture place and on the way back home whe more offten than not whe called at the fish shop for some chips for supper . The fish shop was run by Cliff . For the life of me I cannot remember his first name . Maybe I didn’t know his first name and to me he was just Cliff . The more that I think about it the name Parker comes to me . My mother and dad would leave me to get the chips wile they went home to butter the bread and put the kettle on . In the winter the door of the shop had to be kept closed as the cold wind would blow through . In the summer the door of the shop had to be spraged open because it was so hot inside the shop . If the shop was empty and whe where waitting for chips Cliff would ask me what film I had been to see . I remember the time that the film was Singing in the Rain . The star of the film was Jean Kelly . After telling Cliff about the film I made my way home . The problem was that I had to swing around every lamp post that I was able to find . As the lamp posts where different to what they har now there was quite a few lamp posts . I must have been quite a bit of time because my mother was at the gate looking for me . She asked me what took all the time . I told her that I had to wait for the chips . As whe where going into the house I gave her the chips . She said that they where cold . The chips had to be reheated . As for me , I got a clip around the hear from my dad .
 
The Co-op Butcher
Whe are not very far into the story and the memory as already started to play tricks . I ham not sertan how many CO-OP Butchers Shops there where . Was it one ore two .I know that on my side of Pontefract Road there was one . Can anyone remember two butchers Shops . The shop had a butchers boy and it must have been good training as the boy moved on to becume a maniger . I remember that I had gone to the shops with my mother and she had gone into the CO-OP Shop to get something . A lorry puld up on the main road and the CO-OP driver went into the shop . The driver came back and opened the the doors of the lorry up . A boy came out of the shop and went to carcues lorry . The driver jumped into the lorry witch contained the dead carcasses of cows and pigs . The drivers top was covered in blood at the top from lifting the meat . The boy took the small stuff into the shop wile the man took the bigger things like full cows . The meat was hung up in the shop to be used later . A few dogs attracted by the smell were hanging around the shop . The boy chased them away . The lorry left and the boys work began . He came out of the shop with a bucket of water and put it on road and started to scrub . A few buckets later the boy swilled everything into a drain . It was enough to turn the reader off meat for life . . The red colour stayed on the road for quite some time .
At this point I must digress from the script a little . I once worked for Scot Meats of Bletchley . But that is another story . One of the items that they produced was Black Pudding . I once had to go down to the head office as we were short of something . As a new branch getting the stock right was a problem . In my job as warehouse supervisor I went down to head office quite reggulary . I got to Bletchley , got the stock and after having something to eat and drink I went to get the invoice . A lorry went past as I was waiting for the invoise . I asked somebody what the bad smell was . I was told that the blood wagon had just gone past . The man told me that the driver had know sense of smell . Every body was curling there nose up . The worker took we along to the place that the blood went to . It was pored out of the wagon and into the factory . The smell was really bad . I was told that the blood was mixed with fat , it was at this point that I had to get off . I remember telling Harry when I got back to the warehouse . It took me quite a wile before I would eat Black Pudding .
The Post Office
We take the Post Office for granted a few years ago . It is only in times of cut backs that the Post Office comes to the forefront . Cuts in services ore even the shut down of services are on the cards . A lot as been said about the closure of country post offices this is on the news daily . In some parts of the country like Scotland the Post Office Van is a life line I,. In fact in a few placers in Scotland the Post Office Bus takes people as well We have come a long way from the days of the Pony Express , we now have the Royal Mail . In the village of Lundwood we had a Sub Post Office that did a bit of sorting the mail as well . The van used to call for the post a set number of times a day the post office driver coming out of the office with a number of bags . I can only remember one name of the people who ran the post office and that was Mr. Simmands . I know that the post office was like a shop withing a shop . The post office on one side the general goods being kept away . Apart from stamps you were able to get licences for most things . I remember going a long with dad when he went to the post office for a coloured TV Licence . The nudges and the winks told us that the news would go around the village like wild fire . The post office was the biggest in the area and a armoured car came to deliver money for family allowance day . On that day and every day the door of the post office was kept locked until the van had been .
Handling money these days must make the Post Office a big target for many and a few of the offices have been robbed for there takings .
The Indian Salesman
I was playing at football in the street with the rest of the boys . I kicked the ball into some ones garden and went to get it back . I heard my mother shout me for my dinner . Leaving the game I returned to the house . As dad was on the days at the Glass Works nother was having her dinner when he came home . The dinner was on the plate . After washing my hands I sat down to get it . Mother went back into the house wile I got my dinner .
I was just finishing my dinner when my mother burst into the room . She locked the back door . She pulled me into the house and told me to lie down at the back of a chair . I did as I was told . I got the imprecion that she had flipped . I heard the gate go . A moment later there was a knock on the back door . I stood up to get it . But mother pulled me down again behind the chair . There was a knock again . Whe stayed where whe where . Whe heard foot steps once more and then the sound of the gate being put back in its place was heard . The foot steps went away . Mother said that whe had to stay where whe for a few minuts more After a few minuts whe came back into the kitchen . Mother unlocked the door and went around to see Mrs. Whitehead next door . After I had finished my dinner I went out to play with the boys . All the kids where talking in a lump /. It seemed like there had been an Indian Salesman in the street . He was a seek and he had a Turban round his head . Janet said that he was a funny color he was not Black but a yellow color . End of mistory .
The only colourd people my mother had ever seen where the pit men as they came home from work . To her the Salesman came as a bit of ahock .
The Darly Brothers
A most interesting shop had to be the shop run by the Darly Brothers .The shop was on the right hand side of the village . Although the shop and the Brothers are long since gone the name still lingers on . The date at the moment is 2012 and my Grand Dauter said that she was going to Darlies with her mother . The Brothers names where Herbert and Walt . Herbert was the oldest of the brothers .
The government of the day must have put some restriction on the hours of opening . Did that stop the Darly brothers , like hell it did . As the shop closed for sales in the evening the shop reopened for sales at the back door . One of the brothers was always manning the back door . I think that there was an house at the top of the shop . But there was also a bed in the stock room My dad liked his Woodbines and if he ran out of them he would send me to the shop to get him some more . It was alright in the summer time but it was dark in the winter . I would wait outside the shop until someone came then I would follow them down the path to the shop . I no that the shop did a lot of trade with the miners and people going to work . They not only sold the cigs in cigs in ets they also sold the cigs in ones . .talk about Open All Hours the show must have been made with the Brothers in mind . As it was the show was made in Doncaster , but it could havve been made in Barnsley using the Darly Brothers .
I remember that there was a marble slab on witch the cheese was cut . If you know about marble it shows finger marks up and if anyone touched the slad . Herbert did his top . II remember the time he was out and when he came back there where finger marks everywhere .
The brothers must have Had a fall out because Herbert was there one minut and the next he was gone . I believe that he went to York . I worked for Redfearns Glass and I had to go to the York for a meeting . After the meeting I made my way back to the head office at Barnsley . As I was going to the motorway I was looking for a sandwich shop . I spotted the sign for and I turned of the road and followed the signs . It must have been half day as most of the shops where closed . The sandwich shop was open and I went inside the shop . I got a sandwich and a bottle of pop and went back to the car to eat them . As I was having the sandwich I was looking around . The name on one of the shops was Herbert Darly . The shop was closed so I never found out . Know matter how I tried I never found the shop again .was it the same Herbert Darly , whe will never know .
In order to get more sales the shops had vending machines outside the shop . Walt installed some outside the shop . I know that one was for bubble gum and one was for KP Nuts . It was the latter that was the subject of my story . I was at the junior school and I went home for dinner . After dinner Dave used to call for me to go to school . He called and off we went . Off we went . We got to the shops and we where larking about as boys do . We got to Darly’s shop and Dave looked around to see if the coast was clear . There was nobody about so he tried the machine with the KP Nuts . We had learned that sometimes the Nuts became stuck in the machine and if you twiddled about the Nuts from the last customer came out of the machine . Dave told me that he was able to feel some thing but it was just out of reach . The coast was clear so he put is hand in the machine again . He told me that he had got the nuts and was pulling his hand out . But his hand was stuck . What where whe to do .
Some bigger boys tried to help pull his hand out of the machine with the same result . A man tried as well . By this time there was quite a big croud of people around the shop . Walt must have seen the croud outside the shop and came to investagate . He took one look at Dave with his hand stook in the machine . He went back into the shop and came back with a bowl of water and a bar of soap . No matter how they tried the harm remained stook . The Fire Brigade would have to be called . Away went Walt to make the call . The kids had to go to school and people driffted away , .
One man told Walt he would have to get the Fire Brigade out . And of he went to make the call . He came back saying that the Fire Brigade were on there way . As it was school time the crowd started to drift away . As I was with Dave I staid . Walt went back into the shop to serve a few customers . Dave told me that he would get a good hiding when his mother found out . You where able to hear the fire engine long before it got to the seen . Walt came out of the shop just at the time the fire engine was pulling up outside the shop . The men got out of the fire engine to get a better look . Dave told them the story . Just at that time Dave’s mother got to the shop . The firemen tried to get Dave’s hand out of the machine but it was stuck fast . The lead fireman told Walt and Dave he would have to be cut out of the machine . The moment the fireman uttered the words ‘CUT ‘ Walt went into a dickie fit ‘’. Dave’s mother went white . Walt asked the firemen knot to damage the machine as it was on rentle .The fireman told Walt that he would have to use the cutters . A ambulance pulled up outside the shops and they where told to wait . A police car came as well the party was getting bigger by the minut . They all had to have a look at Dave and the machine . The firemen had to cut Dave’s hand out of the machine . It did k not take long to cut Dave out . The machine was burnt . Walt would have to get a new machine . Dave went in the ambulance for a check up . I went back to school . Dave called for me the next day . I asked him if he was alright . He gave me a pack of KP Nuts that the firemen had given him . At least he got a few KP Nuts for all that trouble . Walt got a new KP Nut machine out of it . Everybody was the winner .
Over the years Walt built a Warehouse on the other side of the Main Ponterfract Road by the side of the paper shop . His sons joined him in the buissness as did his wife Annie . Very often you had to go around fork lift trucks on the main road . I think that the family had more than one shop , but I can not remember where the shop was . What gets me his the fact that the shop is still called Darlies by the kids of today . The family have not run the shop for years . The name must have come from there parents as most of the children where not born when Darlies ran the shop .
Thorpe's Fish Shop
At the time that I was growing up this was the best fish shop in Lundwood . At peak times the queue was on the road outside the shop . Unlike fish shops today the menue was quite loitered . There was Fish Cakes as well as peas .
Barnhard.’s Shop
Barnhard’s shop was the last shop on the right hand side of the shops in the arcade . It was a froute and veg shop . The family were market traders and stood Barnsley Market as well . I went to the Grammar School with the grand son of the family , Brian was his name . The flowers used to be displayed out side the shop for all to see . If it was dry and dusty the flowers were kept inside the shop .
One of my pet hates is sell by dates . At one time there used to be road side stalls selling all types of fruit and vegitables . I used to get my potatoes from one off these stalles . They came by the sack and it might take a week ore two before the sack was used up . If the potatos had started to sprout you just cut the sprouted pease of and they were ready for use . The super market put paid to that by putting sell by dates on every thing . It makes you wonder who the boss is . Us ore the super markets . I must say that before I had my stroke we went quite offten . Sandra uses NETTO these days .
The Water Tank
Maybe it was a War time measure but there used to be a water tank on the right hand side of the village . The side had been knocked out so nobody was able to fall in and get wet The problem was that people put all there rubbish in the tank . Over the years this had built up . People at some time must have put soil in as well because the sides where built up I can not remember the time the tank came down . One minute it was there , the next time that I looked it had gone . The land was sold and in hits place the bingo all was built .